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Medical

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Our Teeth Are Making Us Sick

The left side of Jacquelyn Garcia’s face throbbed fiercely. She had tried taking Tylenol and Excedrin for the pain, but threw them up. On a Monday morning straight after working the night shift as a custodian, she rushed to the N.Y.U. emergency dental clinic. Here a student delivered the verdict: decay so deep it had reached the nerve. The tooth needed to be pulled. Paradoxically, this could make her mouth worse off. Dentists say pulling a tooth can lead to a cascade of other problems: the teeth start shifting, the bone diminishes, the skin sags and the risk of gum disease increases. But Ms. Garcia didn’t have any choice. Her tooth had been rotting from the inside out for more than a year. She didn’t have dental insurance and didn’t want to pay the high fees until the pain had surged and she couldn’t stand it anymore. As Americans debate medical…

Investing in Med-Tech: Pro-Tips to Get the Best of Stock

Med-Tech stock may seem a mixed bag for a new investor. Its performance is great and one of the best in its sector, but the industry is perceived as quite complicated and one which requires deep knowledge of healthcare. But it’s certainly worth it if you take a closer look. Med-Tech boasts above-average returns. The 2016 returns in healthcare show that the sector is in very good shape. And that was the first year in which the expected indicators were underachieved after several consecutive years of impressive growth. Meaning we could likely be due to go another big leg higher in returns. A strong majority (about 90%) of 3,000 companies which participate in 2017 Global Medical Device Industry Outlook saw sales increase in 2016. And it’s not only about major players with global reach. About one-third of the smaller stocks, the firms with fewer than 50 employees, reported sales increases of 15% or more.…

Top 5 Medical Technology Stocks to Watch in 2017 (Video)

Via [Moneyofficials] – To hunt for top medical stocks in 2017 is not an easy job for two reasons. First, a few successful years have led to medical companies being prized in advance. But a not so stellar 2016 brought a certain change in this optimistic mood. Second, in the coming months, the political volatility associated with the revision of rules of the game in this market will continue. The cancellation (and/or replacement) of the ACA by the new US administration can send ripples on a global scale. The likely cancellation of the 2.3% excise tax on medical device alone is going to lead to bigger investments into research and development. Therefore, there are high hopes for good outcome to the industry, and so increased earnings and higher revenues. It’s certain that medical companies will remain a good option for those who prefer reliable growth. Their stocks will continue to…

Canadian Medical Technology Startup ChroMedX Is At A Breakthrough Point With Its Revolutionary HemoPalm Handheld Blood Analyzer

Truly transformational changes are quite uncommon in medicine (such as the mass introduction of anesthesia, antibiotics or X-ray machines, to name a few). They happen once every ten years or so, at best. Most of the changes in this industry are evolutionary improvements. However, Toronto-based ChroMedX Corp (CSE:CHX) (OTC: MNLIF) (FSE:EIY2) is now poised on the verge of a real medical technology breakthrough. The main product of this company is the HemoPalm handheld blood analyzer. This device is much more than just a tightly packed set of precise sensors. it’s a real technological gem, actually. The Canadian startup was founded in 2013 and went public a year later. Now ChroMedX is in final preparations for the HemoPalm launch to the market. If everything goes well (and this reporter doesn’t see a single reason, why wouldn’t it), ChroMedX will manage to seize a major niche in med tech, essentially cornering the market…

One Day, a Machine Will Smell Whether You’re Sick

Blindfolded, would you know the smell of your mom, a lover or a co-worker? Not the smells of their colognes or perfumes, not of the laundry detergents they use — the smells of them? Each of us has a unique “odor print” made up of thousands of organic compounds. These molecules offer a whiff of who we are, revealing age, genetics, lifestyle, hometown — even metabolic processes that underlie our health. Ancient Greek and Chinese medical practitioners used a patient’s scent to make diagnoses. Modern medical research, too, confirms that the smell of someone’s skin, breath, and bodily fluids can be suggestive of illness. The breath of diabetics sometimes smells of rotten apples, experts report; the skin of typhoid patients, like baking bread. But not every physician’s nose is a precision instrument, and dogs, while adept at sniffing out cancer, get distracted. So researchers have been trying for decades to…

5 Reasons Why The Future Of Medical Testing Is Looking Mighty Bright

Over the past two decades, we’ve done much to improve the effectiveness of medical tests but the latest trends are moving in a slightly different direction than they were before. In the not-so-old old days, after a rigorous testing, much of a doctor’s expertise on the patient’s overall condition and the following diagnosis was still more or less “hunch-based”. Today “practicing medicine” first of all means fully relying on the testing process (for liability reasons, in no small terms). Thus, the future of medical testing is closely linked to the ubiquity and accessibility of technologies, which will allow for the most thorough testing and analyses followed by the most exact diagnosis possible. If we’re able to do that, such an approach may change the entire health care model. This transformation may need interim solutions that would have to be tightly integrated with the future early diagnostics methodologies and the workflow…

5 Robots That Are About to Revolutionize the Workforce — and Put Jobs at Risk

When it comes to productivity, humans don’t come close to robots. Machines don’t need sleep, won’t slack off or ask for a raise and generally don’t need vacation days so they can sunbathe in Bali. According to a study from Oxford University and the Oxford Martin School, 47% of jobs in the United States are “at risk” of becoming “automated in the next 20 years.” PwC has similar findings, estimating that 38% of U.S. jobs are at risk of being replaced by robots and artificial intelligence in the next 15 years. And while two-thirds of Americans believe robots will take over most of the workforce in the next 50 years, they’re also in denial: 80% say their job will “probably” or “definitely” be around in five decades. Here are five robots that are coming to take some jobs from unsuspecting humans: Otto Self-driving truck company Otto, started by former Google…

Ethical Dilemma: Can Saving Lives Be a Profitable Business? Technology to the Rescue

Healthcare has its permanent place on every list of most lucrative human activities. Rest assured that at least a third of that list is an enumeration of branches of medicine, medical professions and certain aspects of healthcare that are generating steady and seemingly inexhaustible revenue for private practitioners, hospitals, insurance companies and other businesses. Here lays the problem (actually, problems – plural). The most important of them being the ‘redirection of responsibility’. Since maximizing shareholder value is the end-goal of any corporation (and MDs, at least in the US, prefer to be incorporated), today’s medical profession as a business is being questioned very harshly: cost of coverage and accessibility vs. profitability, state vs. private, cold calculations vs. warmth and compassion, selective vs. universal care, bad vs. good and so on. Not having Karl Marx or Nietzsche nearby to explain stuff is not making things any easier. Not to worry. Humanity…

Silicon Valley’s Quest to Live Forever

On a velvety March evening in Mandeville Canyon, high above the rest of Los Angeles, Norman Lear’s living room was jammed with powerful people eager to learn the secrets of longevity. When the symposium’s first speaker asked how many people there wanted to live to two hundred, if they could remain healthy, almost every hand went up. Understandably, then, the Moroccan phyllo chicken puffs weren’t going fast. The venture capitalists were keeping slim to maintain their imposing vitality, the scientists were keeping slim because they’d read—and in some cases done—the research on caloric restriction, and the Hollywood stars were keeping slim because of course. When Liz Blackburn, who won a Nobel Prize for her work in genetics, took questions, Goldie Hawn, regal on a comfy sofa, purred, “I have a question about the mitochondria. I’ve been told about a molecule called glutathione that helps the health of the cell?” Glutathione…

With Neuralink, Elon Musk Promises Human-to-Human Telepathy. Don’t Believe It.

Billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk, by way of blogger and cartoonist Tim Urban, has revealed in a 36,400-word illustrated explainer the thinking behind his new company Neuralink and its mission to use brain implants to directly link human minds to computers. The post argues that we should augment the slow, imprecise communication of our voices with a direct brain-to-computer linkup. This would permit both telepathy between people and advantageous relations with artificial intelligence, says Musk. Musk even gives a time line. He says that within eight to 10 years healthy people could be getting brain implants as new computer interfaces. And I say it’s not going to happen. The problem with the post is that, despite its length, Musk does not reveal how he’s going to do it. Between today’s relatively crude ways of recording the brain and what Urban calls a mental “wizard’s hat” is just a dotted line. Musk is not…