Before Celebrating Google’s New Ad Blocker Find Out What’s Really Going On

Google, a data mining and extraction company that sells personal information to advertisers, has hit upon a neat idea to consolidate its already-dominant business: block competitors from appearing on its platforms. The company announced that it would establish an ad blocker for the Chrome web browser, which has become the most popular in America, employed by nearly half of the nation’s web users. The ad blocker — which Google is calling a “filter” — would roll out next year, and would be the default setting for Chrome when fully functional. In other words, the normal user sparking up their Chrome browser simply wouldn’t see the ads blocked by the system. What ads would get blocked? The ones not sold by Google, for the most part. The Chrome ad blocker would stop ads that provide a “frustrating experience,” according to Google’s blog post announcing the change. The ads blocked would match…

IOS 11: Deliberate Push to Upgrade or Gross Oversight?

A number of current iPhone and iPad owners myself included, won’t be able to use the next version of Apple’s mobile operating system. Apple announced iOS 11 at its latest developer conference, teasing its plans for the future of the iPhone. However, it’s now been confirmed that several of the company’s devices aren’t in line for the latest update. The new iOS 11 will not support the iPhone 5 – one of the best-loved models – or the iPhone 5C or fourth-generation iPad when it arrives in the autumn. iOS 11 Beta Available. PROFILES DOWNLOAD LINK Developer beta profile of #iOS11.https://t.co/CHpuWwbSWs pic.twitter.com/TytO5hPr3d — iOS 11 (@iOS11beta) June 5, 2017 This means that these popular devices will be stuck on iOS 10, the current version of the operating system, which will stop receiving important security and performance updates from Apple, leaving them potentially vulnerable to bugs and glitches. This poses a…

Oil is Breathing Its Last. In The North Sea, That Is

Moored off the port of Rotterdam, Netherlands, Pioneering Spirit looms so large that it is difficult to recognize as a ship. The crew of 450 is dwarfed by the cranes and pipes that dominate the sprawling layers of decks. For decades, Edward Heerema, head of Allseas, the Swiss-based energy services company, dreamed of building a giant vessel to install oil platforms offshore. But the Pioneering Spirit has found another purpose: dismantling oil fields in the British North Sea. With oil prices dropping sharply in the last two years, Mr. Heerema said he was now just focused on finding enough work to meet his payroll. “I can’t say how long it will take to pay for itself. Maybe 10 years, maybe 30 years,” he said of the ship. The British North Sea was once a crucial source of oil for the world. At its peak in 1999, it produced about 2.9…